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#RebelBeautyBites: Fast Fixes | MakeUp Mistakes

We have all been there; trying to remove waterproof eyeliner after that wing you just made is a little too Nicki Minaj, correcting a sticky lipgloss smear, or trying to keep your makeup in place throughout the day so you do not end up looking like a victim of the Homer Simpson makeup gun.

Today I will give you some simple solutions to help combat the most typical makeup “mistakes” that I tend to get questions on.

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BTS Victoria Fashion Week | Gwen Perkins

 

Problem: My foundation does not stay on all day; it appears to be gone by the end of the day, and my skin looks dry and flaky. What am I doing wrong?

Solution: When your skin is dry, it wants to “drink” and that means literally anything that you put on your face will be absorbed deep into your parched skin in short order, leaving a dry, dull complexion.

In order to remedy this, I suggest cleansing and toning the skin, applying a good quality moisturizer such as Andalou Naturals 1000 Roses Daily Shade SPF 18 moisture lotion, and also applying a primer. Primer helps your foundation go on more easily, stay in place, and keep that fresh look all day. A great primer that is reasonably priced is Physicians Formula Mineral Wear Correcting Primer. It is green, but do not be afraid! This is a colour correcting base, so if you have redness or uneven skin tone, this is definitely for you.

And of course, make sure you are drinking plenty of water; your skin is the largest organ your body has, so it needs water to function well, just like any other organ.

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Problem: I used a waterproof liner to make nice winged liner, but it got out of control and now I look like I should be on a stage somewhere, help!

Solution: Fear not, that overdone wing can be taken down to a more manageable size with two simple tools; foundation and a cotton swab.

Take a small amount of foundation on the tip of a cotton swab, and gently hold it to the area you want the liner to be removed from. Within a few seconds, it will come off with minimal effort and you can continue to remove as needed. Makeup removes makeup; this holds true for almost any product. Foundation can remove lipstick, eyeshadow, and blush. If you have ever used the trick of nail polish removing nail polish, this works on the same theory.

Once you have removed what you want, you can retouch using the liner, of course, I recommend the Kat Von D Tattoo liner pen, as it is easier for most people to use than a brush and gel liner.

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Problem: I love the look of a smoky eye, but every time I try to create this look, I end up with eyeshadow everywhere but on my eyelids, leaving me looking like I went two rounds in the ring. What can I do to prevent this?

Solution: If you ask different makeup artists for help on this, you will get multiple answers. The way that I like to approach this issue is with an ounce of prevention.

Start with a great eyelid primer like NARS Smudgeproof Shadow Base to help the pigment adhere. Instead of loading your brush up with tons of shadow, try building it in layers. Tap your brush out so that any loose pigment drops off before you try to apply it your eye. Use a pressing motion to get the pigment onto your lid; you will end up with a lot less of the shadow in the wind, and more on your eyes where you want it.

If you are doing a smoky eye, start with a neutral shadow as your base, then move to your darker colour. The lighter base will help with blending, so you do not end up with blotchy patches in the shadow. A good quality, clean brush is a tool for success; brushes that are dirty and holding onto oils from your skin will make it nearly impossible to blend out your shadow. If you do end up with fallout under your eyes, use a disposable foam sponge or cotton swab and some foundation to remove it.

Alternatively, some people like to pack on powder under the eyes to let the fallout land on the powder, which can then be removed. A word of caution though; while this may work for those that are under the age of 25, caution for other who may potentially end up looking older. The powder will settle into all the fine lines around the eye, and accentuate them, making you look tired and older than your years. And if you are having photos taken, too much powder is a definite no go. The powder will reflect the light in the photos and will show up as blown out areas under your eyes.

Grab yourself some cotton swabs and go confidently towards trying some different looks; practice makes perfect. It is only makeup, it washes off, and experimenting will help you up your makeup game long term.

If you have a burning beauty question that I did not address here, I will be fielding reader questions in an upcoming article, so ask away! 

Peace, Love, and Lipstick!

Gwen

 

Next week: Travelling Light: The Essentials in your Makeup Bag for a Weekend Getaway

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